Cookies disclaimer

I agree Our site saves small pieces of text information (cookies) on your device in order to deliver better content and for statistical purposes. You can disable the usage of cookies by changing the settings of your browser. By browsing our website without changing the browser settings you grant us permission to store that information on your device.

Current Filters

Recipients:
Cardiff University
University of Oxford
Currency:
GBP

Filter By

Recipient Region
Recipient District
Funding Organizations
Recipient Organizations (clear)
University of Oxford (1,569) University of Cambridge (1,282) University College London (1,143) Imperial College London (748) University of Edinburgh (718) Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (716) King's College London (519) University of Manchester (443) University of Bristol (420) London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (391) University of Glasgow (335) University of Dundee (312) University of Liverpool (307) The Royal British Legion (302) Newcastle University (299) University of Birmingham (298) Cardiff University (259) King's College London (248) University of Leeds (235) Queen Mary University of London (190) University of Warwick (182) University of York (177) Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine (173) University of Nottingham (173) University of Sheffield (171) Merched Y Wawr (162) University of Exeter (153) Cruse Bereavement Care (152) University of Leicester (149) Barnardo's (145) The Guide Association (144) The Scout Association (138) University of Southampton (125) Alzheimer's Society (118) Church of England Children's Society (114) University College Dublin (108) University of Aberdeen (107) The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty (106) Institute of Cancer Research (100) Birkbeck University of London (96) Volunteering Matters (96) The National Childbirth Trust (91) Queen's University Belfast (89) University of Sussex (88) St George's University of London (87) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (86) Education Services - Headquarters (85) Methodist Homes (81) University of St Andrews (78) The Conservation Volunteers (74) See Less

Results

Medicine of Words: Literature, Medicine, and Theology in the Middle Ages. . 02 Feb 2015

Funding is requested to host a conference, Medicine of Words: Literature, Theology, and Medicine in the Middle Ages planned to take place at St Anne's College, Oxford, on 11-12th September 2015. The conference will mark the final year of the project, Salus Animae: Therapeutic Reading in Medieval England funded by the Leverhulme Trust (October 2012 September 2015) and hosted by the Faculty of English Language and Literature. This project explores how reading was understood as a therapeutic act d uring the Middle Ages. Specifically, it investigates how vernacular religious writings directed at the laity aimed to promote health of the soul by evoking intense negative emotions such as fear and sorrow. The conference aims to disseminate the research undertaken by the project: the medieval understanding of therapeutic reading, the impact of theology on therapeutic reading, and how monastic reading practices were developed for wider use by the laity. The conference also aims to disseminate re search by scholars working in related areas in the UK, the European Union, and USA; to highlight the potential of this field for graduate research; and to initiate new collaborations in order to continue and build on the research pioneered by the project.

Amount: £5,657
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Phenomenology and Health: An Interdisciplinary Symposium. 30 Jan 2015

'Phenomenology and Health: An Interdisciplinary Symposium' will take place 27-28 March 2015 at The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH). This meeting will explore and assess the role of phenomenology in health-related research and practice. We aim to stimulate cross-disciplinary discussions between scholars of science and humanities and those engaged in phenomenological practice outside of academia. Phenomenology's concept of bodily consciousness is informing research into the li ved experience of health conditions, enabling explorations of the subjective aspects of illness not always accounted for by more naturalistic approaches. Its emphasis on the social dimensions of selfhood is proving valuable for psychotherapists, nurses, GPs, and others who work closely with clients and patients. Humanities researchers are using phenomenology to think through representations of health, illness, and disability in literature, art, film, and other forms of historical and contemporar y media, and to consider the experience of ill people from ethical and ontological perspectives. From Merleau-Ponty's body-subject and Sartre's thoughts on pain to important works such as Fredrik Svenaeus' The Hermeneutics of Medicine and the Phenomenology of Health (2000) and Havi Carel's Illness: The Cry of the Flesh (2008), phenomenology provides multiple frameworks for the study and practice of healthcare.

Amount: £3,029
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Workshop on the ethical issues in participatory community-led media in engagement with biomedical research. 02 Feb 2015

Participatory community-led media (CLM) has been used within the development sector for well over 30 years but recently we are seeing it used increasingly within engagement with biomedical research programmes in developing country contexts. Despite wide use of participatory CLM the conversation around ethics and the use of these methods is still quite young. Bringing these methods into the context of biomedical research raises further ethical questions. Despite its potential, the use of CLM for social research or engagement raises fundamental ethical questions especially around anonymity and consent and dissemination of the media. Through the workshop we hope to share experiences, develop our theoretical thinking and practical skills relating to these questions. We propose to bring together a group of academics, ethicists and practitioners from Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programmes to discuss the use of participatory community led media with a focus on digital story telling method s with vulnerable groups. The workshop will be held in Siem Riep Cambodia from 12-13th March 2015. It will be chaired by Dr Mary Chambers and Sian Aggett. A total of 18-20 participants will be invited.

Amount: £9,959
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Animal Ethics. 27 Oct 2014

Professor Christine Korsgaard (Arthur Kingsley Porter Professor of Philosophy, Harvard University)will visit Oxford December 1 -3 for a series of 3 lectures, The Moral and Legal Standing of Animals , where she will also seek to discuss our resulting moral obligations towards them. This event capitalises on her presence to bring together a group of philosophers, ethicists, lawyers, veterinarians, and those working in research ethics policy and ethics management to discuss the moral and legal sta nding of non- human animals as it relates to practice, particularly in medical research and research ethics. Participants will attend the lectures, and on the third day will convene to give short prepared responses to Korsgaard's lectures, followed by open discussion facilitated by Jeff McMahan. Christine Korsgaard will give a brief response to the commentators. The second part of the event will consist of discussions around any practical implications for research ethics practice. A series of practical recommendations will be drawn up and made publicly accessible on the Uehiro Centre website. This will accompany the podcast and blog on Korsgaard's lectures.

Amount: £3,950
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Reading and Replicating Bodies: Mimicry in Medicine and Culture, 1790-1914 (an Interdisciplinary workshop). 25 Nov 2014

This one-day workshop will bring together scholars working on the subject of mimicry in the history of medicine. The event will explore how, in nineteenth-century medicine and culture, to know a body was to replicate it. It will ask how medical practices and representations sought to mechanically imitate the body with perfect accuracy, from anatomical models and drawings to prosthetics. How did such replication interact with wider cultural anxieties about the mechanization of the human body? The workshop will also discuss how medicine, and the arts more generally, came to represent human bodies as social-emotional mirrors that instinctively mimicked each other. The meeting will analyse the different, sometimes contradictory, views which emerged of such mimicry, sometimes pathologized as primitive or degenerate, and other times valued as a natural source of sympathy and empathy between humans. The event will trace the afterlife of these practices and concepts in modern bioethical debate s and views of humans as copying animals. The workshop will be held at The Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH) and we plan to publish essays based on the event in a guest-edited issue of the open-access online journal 19: Interdisciplinary Studies in the Long Nineteenth Century.

Amount: £1,722
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Application for student and developing country bursaries to attend the HeLEX Oxford & ELSI 2.0 Conference 'Exploring ELSI aspects of translation in healthcare', University of Oxford, June 2015. 27 Oct 2014

This HeLEX five year celebration and inaugural ELSI 2.0 conference will be held in Oxford on the 23rd, 24th and 25th of June 2015 and will explore the broad theme of Translation in Healthcare. It will be an interactive event allowing people from a wide range of disciplines to contribute to discussion and engage with these issues. Often the best connections and most exciting ideas begin in the coffee break; we want to capture this quality and apply it to the whole conference. HeLEX and ELSI 2.0 w ant to build on ELSI work to date by looking outward to make connections and invite wider perspectives on the global ELSI agenda, especially from hitherto under-represented parts of the world. In part this will involve much greater use of networking and collaboration technologies but this also involves invitation of as many researchers and students from around the world as possible to attend this conference and become involved in ELSI 2.0 from the outset. For this reason we are particularly see king funding for bursaries for students and attendees from low resource countries to attend the conference which will then be open for applications on our website.

Amount: £4,990
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Accelerating the development of next generation malaria vaccines through development of innovative trial designs in malaria-endemic areas. 21 Apr 2015

Malaria remains a public health emergency despite a partially effective pre-erythrocytic malaria vaccine. There is an urgent need to accelerate the development of a more effective multi-stage vaccine. We will use controlled human malaria infection in semi-immune adults (CHMI) to overcome two critical blocks in vaccine development: a) a comprehensive prioritization of antigens associated with blood-stage immunity for vaccine development and b) an adaption of CHMI to test proof-of-concept for tr ansmission blocking vaccines in vivo. We will comprehensively characterize immunity to malaria using >100 antigens in thousands of semi-immune adults, then select 200 with a range of different immunological profiles, and conduct CHMI studies with serial quantitative PCR to measure the parasite growth rate in vivo and relate this to host immunity. In addition we will vary the parasite dose in CHMI and use low-doses of anti-malarial drugs if necessary to produce gametocytes in vivo and demon strate transmissibility to mosquitoes fed on participants blood. We will use the CHMI studies to test candidate pre-erythrocytic vaccines, blood-stage vaccines and transmission-blocking vaccines.

Amount: £4,876,229
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Promoting mental health and building resilience in adolescence: Investigating mindfulness and attentional control. 21 Apr 2015

Mental health problems most commonly start during adolescence. Major depression carries the largest potential burden in terms of years lived with disability and this proposal aims to determine how best to prevent it. It is based on the hypothesis that depression, and co-occurring behavioural problems, in part represent a failure to exercise top-down executive control, impairing the ability to recruit effective problem-solving skills in the face of emotional distress. Mindfulness training (MT) has been seen to be highly effective in adults. This Strategic Award addresses the question: Has mindfulness training (MT) in adolescence the potential to shift the secondary school-age population away from psychopathology and towards improved mental health by addressing key processes of mental regulation and executive control that operate across the spectrum of risk/resilience? Two of three interlinked research themes' examining mechanisms (Theme 1) and implementation (Theme 2) have been funde d. This invited resubmission addresses Theme 3, namely a large-scale cluster randomised controlled trial to investigate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of MT in schools.

Amount: £4,366,023
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Micron Oxford: super-resolution imaging of cellular dynamics. 21 Apr 2015

Micron's major goal is to develop and apply the next generation of advanced microscopy methods to facilitate transformational discoveries in cell and developmental biology at Oxford and in the UK. Micron will coordinate and manage the inter-departmental and interdisciplinary cooperation and synergies required to achieve this goal. It will enable Oxford biologists to become early adopters of the most advanced and technically challenging imaging technologies. Micron has already established an o utstanding track record in facilitating collaborations between microscopy technology developers and biologists across Oxford. This Strategic Award will allow Micron to maintain its position as one of the worlds leading sites for the development and application of the many new forms of advanced microscopy, with a particular emphasis on live super-resolution and single-molecule microscopic imaging. The Strategic Award will provide added value to the considerable existing Wellcome Trust investment in individual biomedical investigators in Oxford, and will also facilitate the adoption of complex imaging technologies by other researchers across the UK and worldwide. Thus, Micron will have a significant impact on the Trust's strategic aim of understanding basic molecular mechanisms in cell and developmental biology in health and in disease.

Amount: £4,679,473
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

A UK Hub to Catalyse Open Target Discovery. 28 Oct 2014

Ageing societies and diseases of modern living require truly novel, efficacious and safe medicines. Increasing investment in R&D has not improved the efficiency of this endeavor. There is an urgent need for novel, validated drug targets. To facilitate this, the Wellcome Trust and other organisations have sponsored large-scale genome-wide association and sequencing studies in patients, identifying thousands of genes linked to human disease, some of which may become targets for pioneer drug disco very. However, this genetic output is not widely exploited because of the lack of data and research tools to prioritise targets. The SGC was created by the Wellcome Trust to systematically solve 3-D structures of novel human proteins, and subsequently to develop novel inhibitors for a subset of these proteins (epigenetic probes). The free availability of data and reagents has amplified its impact and stimulated research in industry and academic labs. This proposal addresses the bottleneck in translation of genetic associations to therapeutic strategies. We will build capacity and infrastructure to create early discovery tools (Target Enabling Packages) for genes nominated by genetics, disease biology and clinical experts. These tools, including protein structures, assays, and initial chemical matter, will provide much-needed links between genome sciences and target discovery.

Amount: £9,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

A strategic vision to drive the control of enteric fever through vaccination 28 Oct 2014

The overall aim of this strategic award is to provide the science to underpin the implementation of new vaccines for the control of enteric fever, uniquely, in different epidemiological settings in Africa and Asia. The vision described here will: Provide missing data on disease burden, antibiotic resistance and transmission needed to support and implement conjugate vaccines for enteric fever, using epidemiological data collection and application of knowledge from (para)typhoid human challenge models. Establish the host factors that determine susceptibility to enteric fever to inform vaccine implementation strategies. Provide a comprehensive approach to diagnostics to allow a more accurate assessment of disease burden, vaccine impact and to inform epidemiological models. Investigate the mechanisms of natural and vaccine-induced protection in human challenge models (UK), test in human-to-mouse studies, and validate in field settings (Nepal, Bangladesh and Malawi) and to develop correlates of protection for use in driving vaccine implementation. Model disease dynamics and the balance between direct and indirect vaccine impact in different settings using the biological and epidemiological data emerging from the programme Strengthen research capacity in enteric fever endemic regions of the world and provide the data for vaccine implementation advocacy.

Amount: £3,642,873
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

A systematic approach to understanding the biology underpinning GWAS hits. 28 Oct 2014

Genome-wide association studies have been extraordinarily successful in identifying DNA sequence variants associated with human diseases and phenotypes, with thousands of risk-loci identified across hundreds of traits. Each of these loci has the potential to reveal novel insights into human biology which can in turn underpin future translational advances. However GWAS loci frequently lie within regulatory sequences which complicates efforts to deliver actionable biological insights. To date, ch aracterisation of the molecular basis of predisposition to specific traits and diseases has been limited to a handful of the many thousands of non-coding GWAS signals. This lack of successful follow-up has impeded the GWAS approach from realising its huge potential. Recently, there have been major advances in our understanding of the regulatory architecture of the human genome, and, in particular, in the development of techniques for assessing the relationships between regulatory elements and t he genes they control. This application seeks funding for international leaders in GWAS, human gene regulation, human disease, and statistical genetics to exploit these recent advances by developing a systematic approach to the functional follow-up of GWAS loci and applying this across a series of diseases selected to represent increasingly complex challenges to biological inference.

Amount: £2,652,112
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

The use of the internet to train clinicians to implement psychological treatments. 20 Apr 2015

Empirically-supported psychological treatments have been developed for a range of psychiatric disorders. If patients are to benefit from these treatments there is a need to develop effective and efficient means of training clinicians to deliver them. A programme of education research is proposed. The primary aim of this research is to evaluate the use of the internet to help clinicians acquire the knowledge and skills required to implement psychological treatments. Two uses of the intern et will be studied. The first (internet-enhanced training) involves trainees being provided with access to a specially designed clinically-rich website which provides extensive information on the psychological treatment together with multiple acted illustrations of its key procedures. Access to the website is followed by an enhanced form of case supervision that makes extensive reference to the website. The second form of training involves access to the website alone with no case supervision ( internet-only training ). This form of training has the potential to be highly disseminable. The effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of these two new forms of training will be compared with that of conventional training (a two-day training workshop followed by case supervision) in a randomised controlled education trial that will employ new measures of clinical competence.

Amount: £150,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

New genetic, imaging and microfluidics technologies for single cell genomics 11 Jun 2015

Two major limitations of single cell genomics is (i) the loss of information about the original location within the sample of the sequenced cell and (ii) low throughput at high cost with only hundreds of cells analysed per day. Miniaturising single cell analysis to pico-litre volumes will critically facilitate higher throughput (10^4 - 10^6cells) at lower costs and sidesteps restrictions in handling. Combined with genetic technologies to record lineage history and spatially localise cells this w ill allow questions to be address at single cell resolution that are essential to understand cell diversification following tissue-contextual interactions and the impact it has on gene transcription. 1) We will develop microfluidics based devices to increase sequencing throughput by increasing the number of cells processed at a low cost, and at the same time enabling the complex handling and manipulation of small cell numbers with minimal loss. 2) We will develop genetic technology to: i) record within the genome the lineage history of each cell, for readout at any stage of interest and ii) to provide a unique fluorescent signature to cells to enable us to provide spatial and temporal context to their transcriptional profiles.

Amount: £720,708
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Non-Invasive Blood Glucose Meters 30 Sep 2015

Diabetes is affecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide who have to monitor their condition using invasive methods (e.g. pricking of finger or insertion of needle into hip region). It is clear that non-invasive, continuous monitoring has the potential to help and encourage patients to monitor their diabetes more closely due to the associated improved quality of life. This incentive will lead to a reduction of hyper/hypoglycaemic episodes and the subsequent reduction of long-term risks, such as morbidity and shorter life expectancy, when this condition is poorly monitored and managed. The Trust has awarded a team, led by Professor Adrian Porch from University of Cardiff, £892k to develop a non-invasive blood glucose monitor (NIBGM). Their device will improve the quality of life of people with diabetes and, with better management of their condition encouraged by the device, improve their life expectancy. It is fundamentally different from all other glucose monitoring systems on the market in that it does not require blood to be extracted from the patient, or for the sensing element to be inserted into the patient’s body. It is merely attached to the person’s hip with adhesive, does not require blood extraction, and provides an instant readout of the blood glucose level on a unit that can be carried in the person’s pocket. The underlying technology for the device is based on microwaves and how they interact with the person’s blood. However, there is no heating (the microwave field strength is much smaller than that generated by a mobile phone) and the only sensation is that of touch. It is envisaged that final device will be around the size of a £2 coin and will be ready for mass-manufacture.

Amount: £97,900
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Cardiff University

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 22 Jun 2015

Not available

Amount: £7,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: Cardiff University

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 22 Jun 2015

Not available

Amount: £10,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

8 month costed extension 20 Jul 2015

The Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics was established in 1994 to undertake research into the genetic basis of common diseases. The objective of the Centre is to gain insight into mechanisms controlling genetic susceptibility to human disease, including the localization and identification of disease genes or disease-causing variants, functional characterization of genetic variants responsible for susceptibility, understanding how they contribute to disease risk in populations and how genet ic factors contribute biologically to disease processes, and the development and application of new analytical tools. In order to achieve this objective the Centre has brought together multidisciplinary research groups collaborating on human and rodent genetics, genetic epidemiology and statistical genetics, functional analysis of disease genes, and structural biology. The Centre has a strong focus of expertise, equipment, and resources centralized in Core groups allowing all research groups to benefit and expand their research strategies. Recent years have seen major advances in human genetics, in which Centre scientists have played leading roles, and we see major opportunities and challenges ahead. This application is for the renewal of the 5-year core award to fund the Centre's Core Groups: Genomics, Bioinformatics, Molecular Cytogenetics and Microscopy, Transgenics, and IT, for the period 1.4.2011 to 31.3.2016.

Amount: £1,466,666
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

PURAK: Wearable Devices for Distal Arm Functionality Rehabilitation 04 Dec 2013

The loss of an arm and hand through amputation following an accident has a drastic effect on the victim. If the victim is also the main wage earner in a family, as is frequent in India, the impact on dependents can be even greater. Providing the victim with a prosthetic hand and rehabilitation at an early stage can boost their chances of regaining ability with their arm and returning to productive work. However prostheses are either not affordable for the large majority of the Indian population or unsuitable for sustainable use and maintenance. The Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore (IISc) has made a breakthrough with new concepts for the design of affordable prostheses. An international collaboration has been formed between the IISc and the University of Oxford with the aim of developing these designs and readying them for commercial manufacture. The IISc, with its expertise in affordable and appropriate design, will work together with biomechanics and clinical trials experts at the University of Oxford and with experts in commercialisation at both centres. This international partnership will ensure the new design ideas from IISc have a major impact on affordable healthcare in India.

Amount: £441,709
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford