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Cruse Bereavement Care
University of Nottingham
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Results

Homicide Specialist Support 01 Apr 2016

To provide specialist counselling support to people bereaved by homicide prior to 2010

Amount: £20,000
Funder: Ministry of Justice
Recipient: Cruse Bereavement Care

Grant to Oxfordshire Cruse Bereavement Care 12 Feb 2015

Funding awarded to contribute towards the initial start up costs to establish a bereavement support service in three hostels for the homeless.

Amount: £1,700
Funder: Oxford City Council
Recipient: Oxfordshire Cruse Bereavement Care

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 22 Jun 2015

Not available

Amount: £27,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

The Integrative Role of FIH1 in HIF-dependent Oxygen Sensing of Cardiac Cells. 07 Apr 2014

Hypoxic-inducible factor (HIF) plays a pivotal role in the transcriptional response to changes in oxygen availability in mammalian cells. Factor inhibiting HIF (FIH-1) may maintain HIF degradation under mildly reduced oxygen tension. We will investigate the role of FIH-1 in cardiac oxygen sensing using in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro approaches. We hypothesize that hearts of FIH1-/- mice will be sensitized to chronic hypoxic exposure and have abnormal mitochondrial oxygen sensing. Mechanisms of reduced myocardial contractility of FIH1 null heart muscle will be elucidated using single fibre techniques in the light of recent in vivo pilot data. Mice will be subsequently housed in chronic hypoxia. Carbohydrate and fatty acid fluxes would be measured in isolated perfused hearts using dual 14C and 3H radiolabelling. Cardiac function will be assessed in both Langendorff perfused hearts and isolated contracting myocytes. Electronmicroscopy would examine the effects of hypoxia on mitochondrial morphology and cellular location of the HIF proteins. The results would contribute to a greater understanding of the role of FIH-1 in oxygen sensing in cardiac cells and allow assessment of whether targeting FIH-1 may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of ischaemic heart disease.

Amount: £379,184
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

PILOT - Cord Trial: Feasibility of conducting a trial evaluating timing of cord clamping for preterms in low and middle income countries 03 Jun 2014

This proposal addresses a series of questions necessary to establish the feasibility ofconducting the Cord Trial in low and middle income countries. Specifically, these are:2.1 What is current practice for timing of cord clamping at preterm, and term, births?2.2 What proportion of births meet the Cord Trial eligibility criteria (28-34 weeks gestation, or1–2 kg birthweight); of these what proportion can be identified before birth, and areappropriate clinical staff present to potentially recruit and deliver the interventions?2.3 For births at 28-34 weeks gestation (or 1-2kg birthweight), what is current practice forcare of the baby in the delivery room, and what is the outcome at hospital discharge?2.4 Can accurate information about timing of cord clamping, and care for the baby in the firstfew minutes after birth, be collected within routine clinical practice?2.5 Does gestation influence the volume and duration of placental transfusion?2.6 What are the potential barriers to recruitment and compliance with the trial interventions,and what are the views and attitudes of clinicians about timing of cord clamping?

Amount: £30,534
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham
Amount: £1,048,501
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Open access publishing costs 2014/15. 15 Sep 2014

Not available

Amount: £11,495
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Structure-aided discovery of kinase inhibitors as targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer 24 Oct 2013

Kinases are important targets for blocking cancer progression. However, many remain to be exploited. For example, no drugs are yet available to specifically inhibit any kinase which is switched on by a regulatory protein called calmodulin. Nonetheless, faulty expression of these “CaMK” enzymes is now thought to play a key role in breast cancer progression. The Wellcome Trust has funded the CAMSEED consortium to discover small molecule inhibitors for a CaMK protein involved in basal-like breast cancer. The three dimensional structure of this target has been solved by the Structural Genomics Consortium and Professor Stefan Knapp at the University of Oxford. Interactions with small molecules are being screened by Professor Michael Overduin’s lab at the University of Birmingham using superconducting magnets and high throughput robots at the national HWB-NMR facility. The design of improved inhibitors that can enter cells and selectively block the oncogenic state is being led by Professor Peter Fischer at the University of Nottingham, with Colin Kenyon at CSIR, Pretoria, designing deuterated analogs for enhanced activity. The result of the two year project is expected to be a set of lead molecules for development as potential therapeutic agents for breast cancer, and may yield a new approach for using nature’s own inhibitory mechanisms to block cancer-causing kinases.

Amount: £287,573
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Structure-aided discovery of kinase inhibitors as targeted therapeutic agents for breast cancer 15 Sep 2014

Kinases are important targets for blocking cancer progression. However, many remain to be exploited. For example, no drugs are yet available to specifically inhibit any kinase which is switched on by a regulatory protein called calmodulin. Nonetheless, faulty expression of these “CaMK” enzymes is now thought to play a key role in breast cancer progression. The Wellcome Trust has funded the CAMSEED consortium to discover small molecule inhibitors for a CaMK protein involved in basal-like breast cancer. The three dimensional structure of this target has been solved by the Structural Genomics Consortium and Professor Stefan Knapp at the University of Oxford. Interactions with small molecules are being screened by Professor Michael Overduin’s lab at the University of Birmingham using superconducting magnets and high throughput robots at the national HWB-NMR facility. The design of improved inhibitors that can enter cells and selectively block the oncogenic state is being led by Professor Peter Fischer at the University of Nottingham, with Colin Kenyon at CSIR, Pretoria, designing deuterated analogs for enhanced activity. The result of the two year project is expected to be a set of lead molecules for development as potential therapeutic agents for breast cancer, and may yield a new approach for using nature’s own inhibitory mechanisms to block cancer-causing kinases.

Amount: £50,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 23 Jun 2014

Not available

Amount: £28,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Open access award 2013/14. 16 Sep 2013

Not available

Amount: £30,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Using animals to benefit animals: How should the UK veterinary profession manage the social and ethical implications of the clinical use of donated companion animal blood and tissue? 12 Dec 2012

The use of healthy human blood and tissue in transfusion, transplant, researchand biobanking is commonplace and social and ethical issues such as motivation, consent, harm and altruism have long been debated. The first pet blood bank in the UK was launched in 2007. Vets are now embracing transfusion medicine and learning from the medical profession and other countries such as the USA, where animal blood banking and organ transplantation have been in existence for over 20 years. A further recent UK development is Veterinary Tissue Bank. The current growth of this area of veterinary medicine urgently demands a close examination of the social and ethical justification for such practices; providing a sound basis for progression. This project will generate novel empirical data on the values and expectationsof animal owners, the veterinary profession and other stakeholders. It will identify ethical similarities and differences between the medical and veterinary fields by reviewing existing literature. Dissemination will includepublications and presentations aimed at academics in social science, bioethicsand veterinary ethics, clinicians and the general public. Ultimately the project aims to produce policy recommendations for the veterinary community about the current and future regulation of these kinds oftechniques and technologies.

Amount: £246,273
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

'Witness' Seminar on the genesis, implementation and legacy of the 'Changing Childbirth' Report. 24 Jun 2013

The Changing Childbirth Report was produced in 1993 by the Expert Maternity Group, convened by the Conservative Government. It was widely heralded for enshrining ideas of choice, control and continuity for women. The Report was regarded as ground-breaking, and led to the creation of many practice initiatives designed to support the Reports core recommendations. The language and philosophy of care which it espoused have continued to resonate in policy documents (for example Maternity Matters, 2 007 and Midwifery 2020, 2010) and in the language of stakeholders such as the Royal College of Midwives, the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists and the National Childbirth Trust. The proposed 'witness' seminar will give key players the chance to reflect on a variety of practical and philosophical issues surrounding the Report and its implementation. Exploration of the period from an historical perspective is in its infancy, and this seminar will provide an oral history resource f or use by policy makers, historians, practitioners and consumers. The event will take place in October 2013 in London with an invited panel and audience including Expert Maternity Group members, midwives, obstetricians, paediatricians and policy makers.

Amount: £5,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Modern Dwelling and the Healthy Body Culture in Germany, 1870-1933. 28 May 2013

I am planning to undertake archival research in Germany for my research project, Modern Dwelling and the Healthy Body Culture in Germany, 1870-1933. The sources and areas of inquiry include a number of disciplinary frameworks. In addition to art and architectural history, this study draws from medical histories and histories of German reform movements to set up a context for the healthy body culture and its influence on domestic architecture. The sources used are books and articles written by architects and critics, architectural drawings, photographs, furniture catalogues and popular hygienic literature including hygiene and health manuals, family advice books, advertisements featuring hygienic domestic products, illustrations of the healthy and degenerate bodies, books and articles written by physicians and life reformers. The project is not only concerned with the physical transformation, but also the changing perceptions of the dwelling.

Amount: £4,998
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Decision-making in end stage kidney disease in Ghana: exploring the ethical and practical context. 18 Jan 2013

Patient decision-making is the subject of extensive research, including in the area of End Stage Kidney Disease (ESKD). However, it is noticeable that very little research has been carried in low-income countries, perhaps because renal replacement therapies (RRT) (transplant and dialysis) are only widely available in more affluent countries. Nonetheless, RRT technologies do exist in developing countries, and patients with ESKD still face choices. We are seeking support for an initial scop ing visit to inform a doctoral research programme exploring decision-making among patients with EKSD in Ghana. Prior to embarking on data collection, we wish to visit the three operational renal units in Ghana to explore how services are organized and the key stages of the ESKD patient's journey. The scoping visit will sensitize the researchers to the key ethical and practical issues surrounding RRT in Ghana, leading to (a) initial recommendations for local practice improvement and (b) publica tion of a review designed to contribute to the limited body of evidence exploring patient decision-making in a resource poor context (with reference to contemporary debates in global health and social justice).

Amount: £3,600
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship 24 Jun 2013

Not available

Amount: £26,640
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham

Open access award 2012/13. 17 Sep 2012

Not available

Amount: £50,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Nottingham