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Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Oxford 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Consolidating practice in social science research for Ebola, DRC. 30 Sep 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">The response to the Ebola epidemic in North Kivu and Ituri provinces, Democratic Republic of Congo has been described as one of the most complex that national and international communities have had to face.Given the complexity of this protracted epidemic, social science research has become a critically important part of the response in order to help contextualise strategies, investigate social determinants of infection, and inform understanding and reception of interventions employed for outbreak control. To routinely generate this intelligence,&nbsp;&nbsp;an innovative solution has emerged in the form of the Cellule d&rsquo;Analyse en Sciences Sociales. UNICEF-funded, this group is made up predominantly of local and national social scientists.&nbsp;&nbsp;Other ad hoc social science research is also being conducted in the field. Through this proposal we aim to consolidate learning and articulate what is needed to replicate similar initiatives in future outbreaks. We will provide remote technical support, conduct structured critical appraisal of the field experience, capture lessons learned, and develop guidance and tools for the current and for future outbreaks. Our vision is to contribute to better outbreak prevention and response through excellence in social and behavioural science research, integrated into current and future responses to infectious disease threats.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £75,161
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Public Involvement in the Governance of Population Level Research 31 Aug 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Population-level research governance is at a critical juncture. Traditional governance tools, like informed consent and expert committee review processes, have been stretched beyond their ability to function in an effort to accommodate research at scale. While consensus on the importance of involving the public&nbsp;in governance exists, there is little agreement on what such involvement means in practice, when it should be undertaken, and what the primary justifications for it are. There is also little understanding of how involvement approaches integrate with other legal and regulatory structures to effectively inform governance.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Primary aims:</p> <ul> <li>Conduct scoping work which examines:</li> </ul> <ol> <li>How should we characterise the range of governance and regulatory challenges that confront us with respect to population-level biomedical research?</li> <li> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">What approaches are currently being used to address these challenges and how, if at all, do these techniques incorporate elements of public involvement?</p> </li> <li> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Where are potential areas that public involvement might be introduced to meet these governance challenges?</p> </li> </ol> <ul> <li>Build an international network which focuses on the intersection of governance and societal involvement in the context of population-level biomedical research</li> <li>Develop a larger research proposal that will address the role of societal involvement in governance challenges in this context.</li> </ul>

Amount: £29,320
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Building a social science research agenda to explore the local contexts of viral hepatitis 31 Aug 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Viral hepatitis is a global health threat that contributes to more annual deaths than HIV&nbsp;or malaria. Hepatitis B virus can be prevented by early vaccination or treated with antiviral drugs and hepatitis C virus can be cured safely and effectively with direct acting antivirals, yet screening, diagnosis and treatment remain low on a global scale. The way hepatitis is experienced and managed is context specific, making public health programmes dependent on an understanding of local knowledge and practices. Despite this, viral hepatitis is, generally, underfunded and understudied from a social science perspective.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">The goal of this specific application is two-fold. First, to build upon an international platform of social science researchers working on research related to infectious disease threats to include a specific working group focused on viral hepatitis. Second, to create a core team of researchers from multiple contexts in East Africa, West Africa, and Southeast Asia to develop and prepare a larger collaborative research agenda<strong> </strong>related to viral hepatitis that will be implemented in low- and middle-income countries. We will host two meetings: one to discuss past and ongoing research and the second to develop a protocol for submission for a collaborative award.</p>

Amount: £27,800
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Mesh Community Engagement Network 30 Sep 2019

<p>Mesh Community Engagement Network (<u>www.mesh-ce.org</u>) is a collaborative open-access webspace and networking project for people involved in community&nbsp;engagement with global health research (CE). Building on a successful pilot, we propose a new three-year strategic approach with a&nbsp;focus on measuring impact, using a <em>Theory of Change</em>&nbsp;to provide clarity on how we expect to make a difference to global health by supporting better research.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">We have&nbsp;three aims: To ensure the value of CE is recognised by a diversity of global health stakeholders and is considered an integral part of research; to generate and strengthen leadership and capacity; and to increase outcomes-focussed, innovative CE. Mesh&rsquo;s vision for the future is that all global health research incorporates high-quality CE built on evidence, good practice and strong networks.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Capitalising on the project&rsquo;s impressive reach, geographical spread and high-level partnerships, we will secure a small&nbsp;team and move management from Wellcome to embed the project at The Global Health Network. A robust monitoring and evaluation plan will allow for greater agility and adjustments to the strategy and project delivery, increasing efficiency and leading to the development of Mesh as a low-cost and high-impact project in the future.<br> <br> Intro film (1min 43sec):&nbsp;<u>https://youtu.be/1jCHxbPLPlA</u></p>

Amount: £243,993
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Inaugural Meeting of the Ebola Data Platform Data Access Committee 30 Sep 2019

<p>The Ebola Data Platform (EDP) strengthens knowledge and capacity across the health, research and humanitarian communities to reduce the impact of Ebola through responsible data reuse. The Data Access Committee (DAC) is a key pillar of the Platform&rsquo;s governance framework, facilitating access to data from the Platform for equitable research and to&nbsp;help tackle the most pressing challenges in the global response to Ebola.</p> <p>IDDO and the Data Access Committee Chair seek to&nbsp;convene the full DAC membership in person for an inaugural meeting in West Africa later in 2019. Key outputs expected from&nbsp;the meeting:</p> <ul> <li>Develop Data Access Guidelines for the EDP and finalise the DAC Terms of Reference.</li> <li>Strengthen the EDP plans to support research capacity across Ebola-affected countries.</li> <li>Align the EDP data access policies with other initiatives across West Africa and the continent.</li> <li>Provide feedback to the EDP Steering Committee on research priorities, issues in data access and promoting equity in data use.</li> </ul> <p>This application requests funding for travel, accommodation and subsistence&nbsp;during the two-day meeting for the 10 members of the DAC and two members of the Secretariat. The current DAC membership is mostly comprised of members from&nbsp;low-income countries, including those directly affected by Ebola.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £19,879
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Chemistry in Cells – New Technologies to Probe Complex Biology and Medicine. 24 Jul 2019

<p>This Programme will provide unique training for a new generation of scientists focusing on the quantification of biologically-important molecular interactions in physiologically-relevant settings. It is currently impossible to accurately and directly quantify interactions of molecules, and their consequences, in the complex physiological settings relevant to diagnosis and treatment of disease. To address this unmet need, we will harness physical science-based approaches to develop technologies that will underpin research across the spectrum of cell biology and biomedical science<br> <br> Scientific goals:</p> <ul> <li>Collaborative research outputs (papers, patents) using innovative approaches to provide new insights into biomedicine.</li> <li>Adoption of our technologies by the broad biomedical research community to study fundamental biology/diseases including Alzheimer&rsquo;s, schizophrenia and cancer.</li> </ul> <p><br> We have developed an innovative framework for our training programme, promoting a diverse and positive research culture change that we aim to propagate across Oxford and the UK.<br> <br> Culture-change goals:</p> <ul> <li>Promotion of a positive research culture in Oxford demonstrated by uptake of our practices across the University.</li> <li>Communication of our strategies&nbsp;<em>via&nbsp;</em>lectures on graduate education and publications in educational journals.&nbsp;</li> </ul> <p><br> These ambitious goals provide an exceptional basis for a multidisciplinary programme that trains scientist equipped as problem solvers for a diverse range of 21<sup>st</sup>century workplaces.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £5,685,862
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Genomic Medicine and Statistics 24 Jul 2019

<p>Genomic Medicine and Statistics (GMS) is a four-year doctoral training programme at the University of Oxford, established in 2008. Over the next 5-year funding period our goal is to train future leaders in the application of genomics to advance human health, equipping them with skills sets spanning experimental and analytical genomic science to address current roadblocks by innovating and realising the potential of genomics. We will do this through a cross-disciplinary approach addressing core themes including genomic and -omic technologies, functional genomics, genome biology, population genetics, evolution, pathogen genomics, genomics of disease, genomic analysis, and application of genomics for drug development, diagnostics, precision medicine and therapy. We will recruit students from diverse backgrounds with a track record of academic excellence and enthusiasm for this field. The first year will provide necessary core skills through taught modules with a minimum of two three-month rotations to gain exposure and training in different research environments prior to deciding on the topic of doctoral research, with additional training tailored to the needs of individual students. We will build a strong cohort, deliver a student-focused training experience with world-class training, supervision and pastoral support and actively manage student transitions including established internships with partner organisations.</p>

Amount: £5,685,862
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Cellular Structural Biology 24 Jul 2019

<p>Structural biology continues to provide one of the most important toolsets for molecular biosciences. It also underlies many crucial industries, supporting biomedical advances in drug and vaccine development and molecular engineering. It continues to develop at pace. The recent electron cryo-microscopy revolution has been transformative and advances in tomographic methods prove likely to soon bridge the gap between molecular and cellular levels. It is essential that we train cohorts of students with these tools.&nbsp;<br> <br> We aim to provide outstanding broad training in structural biology methods, while students conduct exciting research projects. We expect these cohorts to contain future academic research leaders, who apply structural biology to important cellular systems and/or contribute to development of methodologies. We aim to train future leaders of industry, equipping them for research and development. Our program will also prepare students for a wide range of other future careers, providing project management experience, programming skills, and the experience of working in a precise and numerically rigorous scientific field. We will equip and support our students to transition to careers in academia, industry and beyond, while ensuring that we train a cohort to continue to apply and to develop structural biology into the future.</p>

Amount: £5,685,862
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford
Amount: £12,456
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Good Financial Grant Practice/Global Grant Community 30 Sep 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">The African Academy of Sciences (AAS) is strengthening financial management of grants by developing a good financial grant ecosystem, that whilst developed in Africa is applicable to the Global Grant Community.&nbsp; By being applicable across borders, geographical regions and sectors, it will help ensure buy in and adoption by global funding agencies and grantors.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Wellcome have supported the development of the Global Grant Community &ndash; Good Financial Grant Practice by providing the initial &nbsp;&pound;0.5m funding, which catalysed GFGP and additional funding from other funders of circa &pound;3m and supporting Genny to provide advisory and operational support to AAS, Michael Kilpatrick who is based in Nairobi at the AAS and the initiative, initially for one day a week, while Genny was seconded to Sanger as their CFO and for the past year on a full time basis.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">The requested funding will enable Genny to continue to work with the AAS in the development of this initiative alongside the new role as CFO of the OUCRU as an employee of Oxford University.</p>

Amount: £120,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Understanding mental health 11 Jun 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">My proposed secondment project will assess the situation and understanding of mental health in OECD countries. Health systems have not yet adequately responded to the burden of mental disorders, resulting in a wide&nbsp;gap between the need for treatment and its provision.&nbsp;The key&nbsp;goals are to: (1)&nbsp;summarise&nbsp;the different methods of measuring mental health across the 36 OECD member countries; (2) understand the drivers and social determinants of mental health over the life cycle, including prenatal, early years, working age and older age; (3)&nbsp;explore the&nbsp;poorly understood relationship between mental health and subjective wellbeing; (4)&nbsp;explore different treatment methods for mental health, both at the&nbsp;micro level including&nbsp;therapy, medication,&nbsp;and complementary and alternative therapies, and at the macro level including mental health resources, policies, programs and interventions available in OECD countries.&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">This project will&nbsp;provide the most up to date and reliable qualitative and quantitative evidence on what is currently known about mental health and ways to effectively tackle its increasing burden.&nbsp;This will provide cross-country learning and sharing of best practices between OECD members and will be extremely useful to inform policy-making around the world.</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Key words: mental health, determinants, measurements, treatments, well-being</p>

Amount: £13,435
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Establishing global ethical norms on Minimally Invasive Autopsy 11 Jun 2019

<p>Uncertainty about causes of death and unregistered mortality patterns in low-middle income countries (LMICs) are limitations to planning and evaluation of health programmes. Funding bodies such as the Gates Foundation have advocated Minimally Invasive Autopsy (MIA) to address these important kinds of uncertainty and to minimise sensitivities. MIA involves using hollow needles to sample a number of organs without actually having to open the deceased body - as a possibly more acceptable alternative and less invasive to full autopsy.<br> <br> The conduct of MIA in practice presents a number of ethical and social challenges. While the global development and introduction of MIA is growing, little attention has been paid to these problems or to the development of global ethical&nbsp;norms. The World Health Organisation (WHO) &ndash; a key international actor in the context of global health - is particularly well placed to form global ethical norms on MIA.<br> <br> The aim of my project is to provide an overview of key ethical issues associated with designing and deploying MIA globally. I intend to develop a preparatory document for a WHO consultation meeting on establishing global ethical norms, with the aim to inform the development of MIA guideline.<br> <br> <strong>minimally invasive autopsy, ethics, WHO</strong><br> &nbsp;</p>

Amount: £29,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Darwin Tree of Life 30 Sep 2019

<p>Life has evolved from a single origin to generate &gt;1.5 million eukaryotic species. Sequencing all species will provide an inventory of life, transform understanding of evolution, catalogue eukaryotic gene&nbsp;toolkits for biology and biotechnology, and enable monitoring of ecosystems under increasing stress. The Darwin Tree of Life (DToL) is a new initiative that will exploit long read technologies to sequence all 60000 species in the British Isles and play a leading role in the Earth BioGenome Project. This data resource will underpin bioscience for the coming century.</p> <p>We are a consortium of partners who will build and prove an end-to-end pipeline of sample collection, sequencing, genome assembly, annotation and data dissemination that can deliver this visionary project. We will:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Establish sample collection networks (to collect, record and voucher ~8000 species)</p> </li> <li> <p>Put in place large-scale sequencing and analytic processes (including for single cells and small-bodied taxa)</p> </li> <li> <p>Generate reference quality, deeply annotated genome assemblies for 2000 species</p> </li> <li> <p>Develop portals to disseminate the reference genomes, empowering wider scientific communities to embrace genomics in their future endeavours</p> </li> <li> <p>Share expertise in protocol development and informatics among the Darwin Tree of Life partners to strengthen institutional capacities across the consortium, and with the global EBP.</p> </li> </ul>

Amount: £762,584
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Health of the Arts 11 Jun 2019

<p>The proposed project takes up the message of arts access charity Arts Emergency to ask 'is an arts emergency a health emergency?' and also to ask the question of who gets to access the arts from an interdisciplinary perspective.</p> <p>Recent medical humanities research shows us that the arts have a critical role to play in health and wellbeing, both at an individual level and in terms of society as a whole. Meanwhile, government cuts mean that access to the arts&nbsp;&mdash;and therefore by extension interdisciplinary arts&mdash;are in danger of becoming an elite pursuit as value increases but public funding decreases.</p> <p>There are two key strands to this work:&nbsp;</p> <p>1. To use the findings of interdisciplinary research on the value of the arts to public and personal health to make the case for arts access &amp; funding.</p> <p>2. To investigate&nbsp;access to the medical&nbsp;humanities. What skill sets, mentoring, funding, and opportunities do school leavers from diverse and underprivileged need to pursue interdisciplinary projects?&nbsp;</p> <p>This 6-month project aims to broaden access to the interdisciplinary arts, to establish a network of medical humanities mentors, and&nbsp;to design medical humanities skills training.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £16,954
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

State of the art lipidomics 04 Jul 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">As a result of a close collaboration&nbsp;with Thermo Fisher, and three visits to their factory in San Jose,&nbsp;modifications and designs have been iterated that have resulted in a modified Orbitrap Fusion Lumos tribrid mass spectrometer (MS).&nbsp;&nbsp;Critically this unique MS platform&nbsp;not only retains resolution at both high and low m/z ranges but also enables multiple rounds of tandem MS for state of the art lipidomics. Proof-of-principle&nbsp;data demonstrate that the instrument is &nbsp;capable of maintaining&nbsp;native&nbsp;membrane protein complexes and also, within the same experiment, characterising&nbsp;the lipids/ligands that regulate them.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Our goals&nbsp;are to&nbsp;identify critical lipids/ligands through high resolution&nbsp;native MS of membrane protein assemblies as well as&nbsp;multiple rounds of MS/MS (MSn). Additional goals include developing&nbsp;fast fragmentation methods, such as UVPD, to define&nbsp;lipid binding sites within intact assemblies. &nbsp;Effectively this platform enables for the first time, top-down lipidomics directly from membrane protein assemblies. Importantly the&nbsp;direct link between the lipid and the parent protein-complex is maintained throughout the experiment providing a step change over&nbsp;current methods which involve&nbsp;separate lipid extraction and proteomics experiments. There is a high unmet need for this MS platform&nbsp;with multiple users and many exciting applications.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £808,928
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

PubMLST: Disseminating and exploiting bacterial diversity data for public health benefit 04 Jul 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) has been the principal approach to bacterial strain characterization for &gt;20 years and is increasingly employed for whole genome sequence (WGS) analyses (whole genome and core-genome MLST). &nbsp;PubMLST (https://pubmlst.org) provides a major international resource for the storage, analysis, and dissemination of assembled microbial WGS data and hosts &gt;100 databases that provide MLST nomenclature and link curated genetic, provenance, phenotype, and population data. &nbsp;The PubMLST resource, which has existed in various guises since 1998, operates from an Oxford-based web server and uses the open-source and open-access software platform BIGSdb, which was specifically developed for this purpose. PubMLST provides services to a wide variety of other resources, some of which employ the BIGSdb software. PubMLST also hosts the ribosomal MLST (rMLST) database, which enables bacterial species identification by cross-referencing &gt;1.5M ribosomal allele sequences to a validated dataset of ~250,000 genomes representing 9500 bacterial species.&nbsp; Ongoing development of BIGSdb facilitates complex data querying and comparative analyses through a web interface. Data can also be retrieved and queried by other external (e.g. public health) databases via a programming interface. &nbsp;This application seeks to continue the operation and development of PubMLST, specifically enhancing the reuse of data is a major goal.</p>

Amount: £1,200,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Motherhood in Carceral Space: Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Maternity in Prisons and Immigration Removal Centres in England 05 May 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0in; margin-right: 0in">This project seeks to shed light on experiences of pregnancy, childbirth, and maternity in carceral space in England &ndash; namely, within the women&rsquo;s prison estate and the immigration removal estate. The extent, albeit limited, scholarship surrounding this area has focused almost exclusively on maternal incarceration and detention as it relates to child separation. This project would examine how motherhood itself &ndash; spanning pregnancy, childbirth, and maternity &ndash; is experienced and endured within&nbsp;these two types of custodial institutions. Empirically grounded, this project will consist of fieldwork in two women&rsquo;s prisons, and two immigration removal centres. It will investigate how perinatal healthcare is administered within these spaces, and how custody is experienced and endured by pregnant and maternal subjects. Ethnographically oriented, it seeks to lend visibility and centrality to the women confined within these low-visibility spaces. Ultimately, this project seeks to develop answers to the following questions: how is perinatal healthcare experienced by women&nbsp;within the women&rsquo;s prison estate and the immigration removal estate in England? What are the conceptual and practical implications for our understanding of dignity, agency, autonomy, and privacy? How do the experiences of pregnancy, childbirth, and maternity further our understanding of the gendered harms of custodial space?</p>

Amount: £108,516
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Valuing fetal health outcomes in cost-effectiveness analysis 05 May 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">Medical interventions used in pregnancy can affect the length and quality of life of both the woman and fetus. In cost-effectiveness analysis these effects are measured using quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), but fetal outcomes are rarely measured in QALYs, despite being an important clinical outcome. This exclusion will inevitably alter the perceived cost-effectiveness of interventions.</p> <p>I propose QALYs should be used in this setting to support consistent decision making across healthcare, but that how fetal QALYs are valued may differ from the value used for other patients.</p> <p>The aim of this doctoral studentship is to investigate whether QALYs could be applied to fetal outcomes&nbsp;when evaluating the cost-effectiveness of interventions in pregnancy, and how those QALYs should be valued. The project will take the preferences of pregnant women as its starting point, using secondary analysis of interviews with women experiencing high-risk pregnancies, qualitative focus groups, and a discrete choice experiment to first conceptualise and then quantify possible values that could be used in cost-effectiveness analysis.</p> <p>The outcomes of the project will be a valuation&nbsp;based on maternal preferences, which could be used&nbsp;to make resource allocation decisions in pregnancy, while also opening the door to further research in this setting.</p>

Amount: £109,470
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford

Global Environmental (in)Activism: a Multi-sited Ethnography of Industrial Pollution, Illness and Community Resistance in Italy and Taiwan 05 May 2019

<p>The research proposed is a multi-sited ethnographic investigation into the relationship between industrial pollution as a health threat and the ongoing social, political, and moral struggle of two communities living in close proximity to polluting sites. Through a comparative study of the people of Taranto, Italy, and Tainan, Taiwan, this project seeks to explore the political dimensions of environmental health degradation and exposure by conceiving pollution as a complex symbolic configuration assembled at the crossroads of historical, scientific, legal, and interpersonal trajectories. Understanding how these communities make sense of their polluted worlds is fundamental in order to grasp their political aspirations and their self-collocation within local and global narratives of environmentalism.</p> <p>This project expands and&nbsp;builds on Anna Lora-Wainwright's (2017)&nbsp;notion of <em>resigned activism&nbsp;</em>and seeks to scale up its theoretical framework to non-Chinese contexts of environmental degradation. Environmental justice research currently focuses&nbsp;on the local dimension of suffering, and calls for theoretical tools empowering&nbsp;marginalised communities to connect globally and participate in policy making at the international level. This research responds to this call and moves the field toward a&nbsp;global narrative of environmental health injustice, generating tools for the incorporation of ethnographic evidence into policy making and implementation.</p>

Amount: £141,231
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Oxford