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Results

Volunteering Matters 06 Nov 2014

Piloting Engage and Transform, a scheme to break down cultural barriers and develop a long-term partnership of mutual benefit between public and social sector organisations.

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - University of Glasgow 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £166,500
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

Biomedical Vacation Scholarship Programme - King's College London 30 Sep 2019

<p>This award is for 6 students per year for 5 years. It includes ?a salary at the national living wage plus holiday pay and national insurance or equivalent,?as well as?funds to cover or significantly subsidise accommodation and travel (&pound;1500 outside of London and up to &pound;2000 in London).??? It includes &pound;500 to each studentship towards research expenses.??? Unspent funds can be repurposed on further students or recruitment costs.&nbsp; Wellcome wishes to ensure a greater diversity of students (in relation to socio-economic background and ethnicity) progress to postgraduate research.&nbsp;<br> Over 5 years of the Programme we encourage organisations to aim for:&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from underrepresented or disadvantaged groups, depending on priorities set by each organisation.&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> <br> -At least 50% of students recruited to the programme to be from non-Russell Group Universities. For the remaining 50%, organisations should consider how to recruit students from other universities as well as their own. Wellcome has included this recommended target as research indicates that most of the high-achieving STEMM graduates from minority ethnic backgrounds are located outside of Russell Group universities.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £197,340
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Scaling-up Health-Arts Programmes: Implementation and Effectiveness Research (SHAPER) 30 Sep 2019

<p>This proposed programme at King&rsquo;s College London (King&rsquo;s) and King&rsquo;s Health Partners (KHP), and in close collaboration with University College London (UCL), will translate arts in health research into sustainable, standardised&nbsp;and scalable health interventions that make both clinical and economic sense.&nbsp;Our primary aim is to upscale three&nbsp;<u>known effective</u>&nbsp;arts interventions (Melodies for Mums for Postnatal Depression, Dance for Parkinson&rsquo;s, and Stroke Odysseys) and embed them in a clinical pathway across KHP, thereby strengthening the case for NHS Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) to recommend and fund such interventions in the long-term. We will seek to establish defined, clinical referral pathways, from either primary or secondary care settings. In addition, by examining larger cohorts than has hitherto been possible, we will gather further evidence of (i) the clinical effectiveness of our chosen interventions, and of the mechanisms underpinning it, (ii) the implementation effectiveness (i.e., acceptability, feasibility and appropriateness), and (iii) their economic effectiveness. The programme will further involve the largest implementation research centre outside North America, the King&rsquo;s Centre for Implementation Science, as well as clinicians and researchers across King&rsquo;s/KHP/UCL, and the three award-winning arts organisations,&nbsp;Breathe Arts Health Research, the English National Ballet and&nbsp;Rosetta Life.</p>

Amount: £1,999,998
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

University of Glasgow Wellcome Trust Translational Partnership 30 Sep 2019

<p>The University of Glasgow has a tradition of delivering excellent research and aims<br> to develop 'worldclass, world changing' impact across social, economic and cultural<br> areas. Our College of Medical, Veterinary &amp; Life Sciences (MVLS) spans a diversity<br> of disciplines with research into processes at every biological level from genes, to<br> cells, organs, individuals, populations, and ecosystems. MVLS is grounded in the<br> principle that all research can achieve impact, making a constructive difference in<br> some way, and at some time, to ultimately benefit society. Our strategic aim to drive<br> a partnership approach to translation aligns perfectly with Wei/come Trust's<br> ambition for the Translational Partnerships (TP). Together we will further our<br> ambitions to develop real world benefits from our research through the development<br> of a positive and supportive culture in which our researchers and their translational<br> ambitions will thrive. Our TP will enable us to:<br> 1. Grow and develop our translational pipeline - through a programme of research<br> audits and the provision of support tailored to individual project needs<br> 2. Accelerate the journey of our translational projects - by providing researchers<br> with the tools to access relevant resources and to work in partnership with industry,<br> NHS and other stakeholders.&quot;</p>

Amount: £800,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

The New World of Medically Assisted Reproduction and Ethical Governance in the Muslim Middle East: Establishing a Robust Network 31 Aug 2019

<p>In the Muslim Middle East,&nbsp;the growth of&nbsp;assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) has not been accompanied by the creation of&nbsp;comprehensive guidelines and regulations. In this region, any method of medically reproductive assistance is consistently governed by Islamic law. Given divergent sectarian perspectives among&nbsp;Sunni&nbsp;and&nbsp;Shi&rsquo;a&nbsp;Muslims, there are various approaches to ARTs.&nbsp;Sunni religious authorities banned all forms of ARTs involving third-party donors, due to their strict faith regarding incest and biological lineage. Nevertheless,&nbsp;Shi&rsquo;a&nbsp;Muslims hold&nbsp;more progressive&nbsp;opinions on gametes and embryo donation, and gestational surrogacy. Despite this conflict of beliefs, two&nbsp;Shi&rsquo;a dominant countries, Iran and Lebanon, supply the donor technology for infertile couples from both&nbsp;Shi&rsquo;a&nbsp;and&nbsp;Sunni&nbsp;sectors in the Middle East.</p> <p>This project aims to build an international network of humanities scholars, social scientists, bioethicists, policy-makers, regulators, scientists, and other stakeholders, to understand the key debates on the ethics and governance of ARTs in this region.</p> <p>Moreover, it will lay the groundwork for a future large grant application by building an international and collaborative network to explore the global and regional perspectives about how to develop more authoritative and efficient ethical governance of the new ARTs in this geo-politically far-reaching region.</p>

Amount: £29,575
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Healthy Scepticism 31 Aug 2019

<p><em>Healthy Scepticism&nbsp;</em>aims to examine and find sense in the cloud of doubt, suspicion, cynicism, and distrust that has surrounded medical practice from the mid-20<sup>th&nbsp;</sup>century to the present. Rather than dismiss sceptics of medicine as outliers of our cultures of expertise, the project will engage them in search of critical insight into medicine&rsquo;s political, social and epistemological status past and present.Thinking through the species of medical scepticism will form the basis for a taxonomy of how and why medical scepticism functions, ranging as it does in use from the medical laboratory as a guarantor of scientific validity, the clinic as a correction for an over-reliance on judgment and&nbsp;instinct, and the public, where its roles run the gambit from structural to personal critique and everything in between. Investigating scepticism about health is an intentional exercise, in getting to know medicine better, getting to know what our expectations for medicine are, and how, when, where, and why they have or have not been met.&nbsp;But <em>Healthy Scepticism </em>is at the same time&nbsp;intended to offer&nbsp;critical perspective on the position &ndash; the health - of scepticism itself, as a form of critical engagement in and for our uniquely sceptical age.<br> &nbsp;</p>

Amount: £29,317
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Clean air, good health Nairobi: creative, participatory lung health research 12 Sep 2019

<p style="margin-left: 36pt; margin-right: 0cm">Air pollution is a global health priority, leading to reduced life expectancy and increased respiratory disease. Air pollution is high in major cities, with residents of informal settlements particularly badly affected. A previous project, AIR Network, successfully used innovative creative methods to raise air pollution awareness in Mukuru, an informal settlement in Nairobi, Kenya. The current project, which emerged from community consultations, will extend AIR Network methods into community sensitisation to increase residents&rsquo; (including children/youth) knowledge of air pollution and lung health in Mukuru and a neighbouring higher-income area, Buruburu, and empower them to engage equitably in child lung health research (the forthcoming Tupumue study). We aim to: raise air pollution and lung health awareness and promote local knowledge-sharing/advocacy; support community input to the Tupumue fieldwork design; and build children/youth&rsquo;s confidence about becoming Tupumue participants/citizen scientists. To do this, we will hold community workshops to co-develop participatory, creative sensitisation strategies, and train community members to implement them in strategic locations to maximise diversity in engaging local children/youth/parents/teachers/youth workers. AIR Network findings that creative methods successfully build trust and break down barriers make us confident of achieving sustainable impact in air pollution and lung health awareness-raising and equal health research partnership-building.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £97,428
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

Wellcome Innovations Translational Partnership@ King's 30 Sep 2019

<p>This partnership will enhance translational research at King's, accelerating the rate at which<br> discovery science is converted into benefits to patients and building on our entrepreneurial<br> culture. The partnership will focus on excellence in advanced therapies, neuroscience &amp;<br> mental health, healthcare engineering and physiological medicine (cardiovascular,<br> immunology and cancer).<br> To accelerate translation of research into patient benefit, the partnership will undertake three<br> main activities:<br> &bull; Creation of the King's Translational Academy, which will provide group-level training<br> and signposting for academics across King's who wish to develop their skills in<br> translational research.<br> &bull; Creation of a new team of Translational Research Managers, providing dedicated<br> support to academics embarking on translational research programmes.<br> &bull; Creation of a new Commercial Development Fund, supporting the development of<br> research towards commercial transactions (partnerships, licensing and spinouts).<br> These activities will act in synergy to enhance translational culture, support and activity<br> across King's.</p>

Amount: £1,000,000
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Integrative Infection Biology - Mechanisms and Control of Disease 24 Jul 2019

<p>The mission of the proposed IIB Programme is to inspire the next generation of innovative world-class researchers to tackle global infection challenges. We will achieve this by shaping excellent PhD projects that build synergistic collaborations across the University of Glasgow and our partner institutes. Our aim is to give all students an exceptional experience, driving them to build their careers with the ability, confidence and integrity to make transformative contributions to global health. Our principles are promoting inquisitive and rigorous science, imparting technological and analytical skills, and reinforcing personal well-being.&nbsp;Our graduates will be &lsquo;Scientists without Boundaries&rsquo; at ease with the implementation of far-reaching interdisciplinary concepts on the local and global stage.&nbsp;</p> <p>The IIB Programme is integrated around Glasgow&rsquo;s core of global excellence across infectious disease research, including pathogen biology, pathogen-host interaction, epidemiology, ecology and transmission control, encompassing &gt;25 Wellcome Trust-funded investigators. We have partnered with key institutions in Europe and Africa, to offer PhD students exceptional opportunities in all areas of infection biology. UoG funding will add 2 students from Africa each year, making 7 altogether. Students will select projects after laboratory rotations and be fully mentored through to a &lsquo;PhD-Plus Year&rsquo; fostering the transition to their post-doctoral career.&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £5,488,462
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

Advanced therapies for regenerative medicine 24 Jul 2019

<p>The goal of the programme is to train a new generation of researchers in the advanced therapies that underpin regenerative medicine, including cell transplantation, gene therapy and endogenous tissue repair. At the heart of this young field is the importance of translating laboratory-based studies to patient benefit. Thus, students will gain knowledge of the underpinning discovery science, and clinical and commercial applications. Moreover, to foster translation we will bring together researchers in different disciplines, so that the students appreciate the creative possibilities of working at the interface between different fields. Supervisors are drawn from across King&rsquo;s College London, spanning clinical, nonclinical, early, mid-career and senior researchers. The first year comprises three rotations, combined with taught courses and master classes, leading to the award of an MRes. This is followed by three years of focused research. Partner organisations and secondments provide additional training opportunities. From the outset, the programme emphasizes growing as a scientist, exploring post-PhD opportunities, and the scientist in society. Students and their supervisors are seen as partners in a journey, with a special focus on fostering mutual respect and understanding.</p>

Amount: £5,958,810
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Neuro-Immune Interactions in Health and Disease 24 Jul 2019

<p>Cross-talk between the nervous and immune systems is critical for survival, and disrupted neuro-immune communication is observed in many debilitating conditions, including chronic inflammatory, neurodegenerative and psychiatric diseases. Yet, research and training in neuro-immune interactions is generally conducted in discipline-specific silos. We propose to <strong>accelerate ground-breaking interdisciplinary research and knowledge sharing by instituting a unique PhD training programme in Neuro-Immune Interactions in Health and Disease. </strong><br> <br> We will deliver:</p> <ul> <li>World-class scientific training, provided in a flexible, student-led fashion, by internationally<strong> </strong>leading investigators, using state-of-the-art technologies, cutting-edge science and supervision methods (Assessment, Feedback and Development (AFD)<strong> </strong>meetings, PhD Progress Committees).</li> <li>Extensive skills training to transition students in and out of the Programme &ndash; individually tailored and formalised in a personal development plan (PDP).</li> <li>A diverse<strong> </strong>and<strong> </strong>inclusive training environment, reflected in our Programme Management Board (PMB), supervisors, recruitment and partnership plans.</li> <li>An open and positive research culture, including training in research integrity, data sharing, bespoke<strong> </strong>mental health provisions and zero-tolerance of bullying and harassment.</li> <li>A new generation of scientists with the knowledge, skills and networks to drive world-leading neuro-immune research, who can excel equally in academic and non-academic professions.<br> &nbsp;</li> </ul> <p><em>Searchable keywords: share, sharing, world-class, flexible, positive, diverse, inclusive, skills training, mental health</em></p>

Amount: £6,293,560
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London
Amount: £15,224
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

Health Emergencies: Evidence Brief for Policy 11 Jun 2019

<p>An evidence brief for policy would be developed for country teams/Emergency Division working in concert with EVIPNet.</p> <p>Following identification of health priority issues, the project would:&nbsp;</p> <p>* develop searchable research questions and search strategies. Evidence will be retrieved, mapped and appraised for quality, and examined for local applicability. In this way the project will be fully relevant to local contexts and support the WHO values capacity building and empowerment.</p> <p>* deliver a summary of packaged, relevant information i.e. an evidence brief for policy, to frame the policy priority issues, outline the evidence and the important governance, financial and delivery considerations.&nbsp;</p> <p>* convene a deliberative dialogue for a fully collaborative process.&nbsp;</p> <p>* support policy choice and implementation.&nbsp;</p> <p>* allow for monitoring and evaluation.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £17,749
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Glasgow

Nature Photograms in the Anthropocene 11 Jun 2019

<p style="margin-left: 0cm; margin-right: 0cm">This project considers the photographic practice of three contemporary artists who produce photograms, intimate close-ups of the natural world, asking: how do these artists portray humanity&rsquo;s relationship with and responsibility for nature in the age of the Anthropocene? I will be working with a selection of material from the V&amp;A Photography Collection to investigate the contemporary resonances of (and historical references to) the Victorian cyanotype photograms of Anna Atkins&rsquo;, who pioneered nature photography in 1854. In particular, I will be looking at photograms produced by Barbara Baran (1956&ndash;) and Zafer Baran (1955&ndash;), Elaine Duigenan (1964&ndash;), and well-known photographer Garry Fabian Miller (1957&ndash;), as well as Anna Atkins&rsquo; cyanotypes. I will draw on the V&amp;A&rsquo;s previous exhibition &ldquo;Shadow Catchers: Camera-less Photography&rdquo; (13 October 2010 to 20 February 2011) and its associated publication <em>Shadow Catchers: Camera-less Photography</em> (2010), curated and written by Martin Barnes, Senior Curator of Photographs at the V&amp;A. This project will look particularly at the ways in which contemporary artists utilise photogram technology to highlight an intimacy and proximity between humans and the natural world, and how this emphasis on intimacy and proximity poses a call to greater responsibility for the natural world.</p>

Amount: £28,796
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter

Age & Ageing: Old Skin 11 Jun 2019

<p>With an ageing global population, questions of how we see older people are central to science, culture and the creative industries. Because of its importance, Age and Ageing is one of the current research themes that the V&amp;A Research Institute (VARI), which brings together curators, academics, artists, designers and audiences, is seeking to investigate. The Museum is&nbsp;looking at it through a contemporary lens, considering today&rsquo;s ageing population, its implications for our world, how we design it and our systems for living together, but also in terms of its connections to the past. The V&amp;A seeks to explore different readings and conceptions of age, ageing and inter-generational relationships, from different historical periods and a range of cultures, in order to stimulate new thinking about creative solutions to today&rsquo;s challenges. In undertaking the secondment, I will be moving across time and place to look at responses to the visible signs of age on the surface of the body: wrinkles, sagging skin, scars, pigmentation changes. In writing blogs, giving talks, and creating virtual collections of images and objects related to the ways in which we read bodily transformations over time, I will support the museum's aspirations to reach wider audiences.&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<br> &nbsp;</p>

Amount: £27,317
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: King's College London

Horseshoe crab use in securing public health: challenges and alternatives 11 Jun 2019

<p>This project will develop understanding of the use of horseshoe crabs in endotoxin testing as a complex scientific and societal issue, situated at the interface of human, animal, and environmental health. Bacterial endotoxins pose a serious public health concern, causing fever, inflammation, and death, meaning testing for endotoxins is vital for the safe production and use of injectable medicines and vaccines.&nbsp;</p> <p>Endotoxin testing currently uses blood harvested from wild horseshoe crabs in the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test. However, there are increasing concerns around the impact of capturing and bleeding ~500,000 crabs annually on animal welfare, coastal ecologies, and the sustainability of pharmaceutical supply. A synthetic substitute has been available since 2003, but uptake is slow, and there are many uncertainties and views on the future of endotoxin testing.&nbsp;</p> <p>This project has been developed with the RSPCA. It will use social science methods to engage key stakeholders and understand their differing interests and perspectives on the biomedical, sustainability, animal welfare, commercial, and ecological risks around future horseshoe crab use. Goals are to use social science to understand the challenges to developing and embedding alternatives, and support dialogue around a currently invisible issue through stakeholder report, academic articles, and public-facing poster.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p>

Amount: £26,153
Funder: The Wellcome Trust
Recipient: University of Exeter